comprehensive test ban treaty

Report: Meaningful Multilateralism: 30 Nuclear Disarmament Proposals for the Next UK Government

The need for nuclear disarmament through multilateral diplomacy is greater now than it has been at any stage since the end of the Cold War. Trust and confidence in the existing nuclear non-proliferation regime is fraying, tensions are high, goals are misaligned, and dialogue is irregular. 

In Meaningful Multilateralism, BASIC and UNA–UK offer 30 multilateral disarmament proposals for the incoming UK Government after the General Election on the 8th June, themed according to three types of leadership the UK has previously shown in disarmament:

The role of the nuclear test ban as a non-proliferation and arms control instrument

The Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) was agreed in 1996 after more than 2000 nuclear tests had left a lasting, poisonous legacy. The treaty’s negotiations had already contributed to the indefinite extension of the NPT the year before (having contributed to the failures of the 1980 and 1990 NPT Review Conferences). Confidence in arms control and disarmament was high, and nuclear arsenals were falling dramatically. Strategic relations were good. But things look very different today, with high levels of distrust and low confidence in achieving further disarmament progress.

Arms Control, Non-Proliferation & Disarmament

BASIC has followed developments around nuclear arms control, non-proliferation and disarmament treaties for almost thirty years. This page includes links to issue areas for recent coverage, factsheets and other resources for key treaties, initiatives and dialogues that BASIC has focused on as key steps in achieving progress towards our vision.

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Almaty and Prague

This week, talks over Iran’s nuclear program will resume on Friday and Saturday, in Almaty, Kazakhstan. Friday will also mark four years since President Barack Obama delivered his landmark speech in Prague, Czech Republic, where he called for a world free of nuclear weapons and outlined the details of how his first administration would handle nuclear weapons issues.

This Week: Obama's inauguration, just in time for Israeli elections and the opening of the CD

This week marks the formal start of Barack Obama’s second term as President of the United States. On Monday, he will make his public inaugural address in Washington (having been sworn in formally on Sunday, January 20th). The current agenda in the United States is dominated by the fiscal cliff and domestic gun control issues so Obama may have little time initially to kick off on foreign policy issues for a while.

Trinity nuclear test anniversary - U.S. first to test, but will it be the last to fully support a ban?

Today is the 67th anniversary of the world’s first nuclear explosion test, known as “Trinity”, which used a plutonium core. It was unnecessary for the first use of a nuclear warhead, on Hiroshima three weeks later, as designers were so confident about that form of HEU ‘gun-type’ warhead.

U.S. Report on the CTBT

20 years CTBT Ministerial Meeting

Although all eyes are currently on the second Nuclear Security Summit happening today and tomorrow in Seoul, South Korea, a significant development on nuclear issues will also happen this Friday, when the U.S. National Academy of Sciences releases it long-awaited report on the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). The report, while technical, will have far-reaching political implications for nuclear arms control.

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