Asia

China’s UUV seizure was about undersea dominance

As the USNS Bowditch was recovering a UUV (unmanned underwater vehicle, or underwater drone) in the South China Sea on 15th December, a light-fingered Chinese Navy salvage ship reportedly called Naniju swooped in and took it in spite of repeated bridge-to-bridge demands to return the craft. Whilst this may have involved an early challenge to Trump, it is more likely to be connected with an emerging strategic battle over control of the undersea environment.

Implications of the Marshall Islands Case for nuclear disarmament

Bikini Atoll

On 5th October, the UN International Court of Justice (ICJ) rejected proceedings made by the Republic of the Marshall Islands against three nuclear-armed states -- India, Pakistan and the United Kingdom -- for alleged failure to negotiate on the cessation of the nuclear arms race and nuclear d

International Cooperation over North Korea: Possibilities and Limitations for Russia

North Korea's fourth nuclear test followed by an orbital rocket launch has presented the Russian Federation with another opportunity to find common ground with other global powers and demonstrate leadership in international affairs. But this objective is complicated by policy differences between itself and its partners in Beijing, Washington and to a lesser extent Seoul.

Nuclear-free Mongolia: a model for northeast Asia?

For some countries, the response to grave feelings of national vulnerability has been the acquisition of nuclear weapons. This is especially true in Northeast Asia, where some countries either already have nuclear weapons (China and North Korea), or have had serious debates about acquiring them (such as in South Korea). Nuclear disarmament in Northeast Asia is hindered by both domestic and external factors. Yet the global disarmament movement, and, specifically, advocates for denuclearisation in Northeast Asia have an unlikely yet powerful model of hope - Mongolia.

US - North Korea: An Unnecessary Crisis

Let no one say the Trump Administration has not been creative in foreign policy in its first 100 days. It has created a full-blown crisis over North Korea and it is sustaining it.

The crisis was not caused by North Korea’s nuclear weapons programme. It was caused by what the U.S. Administration says about it. “We won’t allow North Korea to develop nuclear weapons and long-range missiles,” said President Trump. Vice-President Mike Pence warns North Korea not to test America’s resolve.

United States inconsistency complicates cooperation with Russia on DPRK

Setting the tone for a potential shift in the US's policy of multilateral cooperation over North Korea, Joseph Yun, the US Special Representative for North Korea, visited Moscow from April 4-6. There he met with Russia's Deputy Foreign Minister Igor Morgulov, where both parties expressed mutual concerns over North Korea's developing missile program.  

Mainstreamed or Sidelined? Non-NPT States and the Nuclear Order

Our Project Leader, Sebastian Brixey-Williams, asked a Carnegie panel of nuclear practitioners from India, Israel, and Pakistan whether they saw their states as responsible nuclear-armed states, and what criteria they use to make such an assertion. Not surprisingly, all the participants said yes, citing various criteria such as nuclear security, nuclear safety, mindfulness of maintaining stability, transparency and a robust and effective civil society.

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